BIOGRAPHIES

DIANE STAFFORD

Living and loving, writing and sharing, I enjoy a great sunny-sunny-sunny life in beautiful Southern California. Because I truly love children, I now am focusing on helping kids by tutoring them in writing and teaching writing classes in schools. So, if you have a child who complains, “I hate writing—I don’t know what to write,” this blog is for you.

An ADHD writer, I know how to bypass distractions (snacking on Breakfast Cookies, oatmeal cookies, and quality bakery cookies, and chatting with dogs, friends, and family) to enjoy my writing madly, crazily, happily.  Following the philosophy “keep lots of projects going on,” I have sold hundreds of magazine articles as well as 14 books. (Ah, the author’s world—that’s an area I’ll discuss, as well as efficient ways to get your writing published.)

To write 14 books, I had to learn how to zigzag around ADHD issues that sent me flying off the rails at times, but I still was lucky enough to become a prolific writer. My true love for the written word eventually wafted me along on a veritable magic carpet, and I have had a career that never for a second felt like work.

Editor of five magazines, speechwriter for the astronauts, writing instructor/tutor, and nonfiction book author, I have had worlds of fun with writing. So, no surprise, sharing my enthusiasm for writing comes as naturally to me as breathing. Nothing thrills me as much as the glow on a student’s face when they or he or she realizes that writing is do-able. The truth clicks in; the happiness flows. The fantastic discovery for every child is that ideas on paper or typed in the computer really, truly matter. These are fresh and new and unique—in the world.

MELISSA MEAD

Melissa Mead, who juggles jobs as a running coach, fitness apparel retail salesperson, freelance writer, and budding high school English teacher, is now turning her energy to coauthoring a writing book for reluctant writers, grades 6-12, with Diane Stafford.

With a writing mentorship that bloomed at (where else?) Starbucks, the two enjoy a shared passion for teaching, for writing, and for sharing what they know.

“Today’s kids try to write essays as if these were long texts,” she points out, zeroing in on one of the big challenges for writing coaches and teachers today.